Posts Tagged: pki

At the moment I’m preparing for my CCE exam and one of the things I like to do is perform several setups. For this tutorial I implemented a XenDesktop & XenApp 7.5 server. A StoreFront server and a virtual NetScaler with a developer license. I already have in place a CA for my self signed certs, the domain joined machines automatically trust the Root CA cert and a Domain Controller is in place.

The goal of the tutorial is to get the StoreFront websites running on SSL. The XML traffic should be encrypted and the NetScaler has to connect to the StoreFront servers through SSL. Let’s start!

In some cases it’s necessary to create a pfx file which contains the root and intermediate certificates. We have an application that will not accept the certificate without the certificate chain in there. So here’s how to make that work.

In this article I’m going to show you the commands you need to convert your .PFX Certificate file to a seperate certificate and keyfile. This article can come in handy when you need to import your certificates on devices like Cisco routers/loadbalancers etc. where you probably need to import the certificates and keyfiles in plain text (unencrypted). My tool of choice (but there might be others) is OpenSSL for Windows, which can be downloaded here

In this topic I hope to give a little information about certificates, PFX files and how to export them into other formats. A lot of applications require a certificate in some format (encrypted or not) to encrypt their datastream. In this topic I’m going to to cover how to create a PFX file. A PFX file is an encrypted file that contains both your public and your private key, and is password protected. I’m not going to cover how pki works, but just click this link or use Google and you’ll find all the information you need.